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adviser secretly flew to china, beginning a string of meeting ises that would eventually open that isolated eastern nation to the western world. that opening checked soviet expansionism and in a sense was the beginning of the end of the cold war. >> that was the week that changed the world. >> it was also the beginning of china's entry into the world economy, which has resulted in that country becoming the world's second largest economy. but back then, the idea of a reproachment with china would have been rejected as pure fantasy. china was a radical revolutionary communist regime that had been fighting america and its allies across the globe. how did the decision come about in the midst of such intense oppositi opposition? what were the internal maneuvering that paved the way? the secret dealings that made it actually happen? who better to ask than the man himself, dr. henry kissinger. >> this is what the world looked like when you enter into the white house with richard nixon. the united states has had no relations with china. we have been implaquably opposed to this regime.
to china's extravaganza. most charismatic, pat? >> rg3. redskin rookie of the nfl. maybe mvp. has set this city on fire. >> marco rubio. senator from florida whose articulate to the point of almost being dem ogic. . but he is a riveting speaker and he has a future. >> are you afraid of him. >> no. i just pointed out his attributes. >> he is richly republican. you know that? >> right. but the democrats have their bench, too. >> i mean, after that, you know, the democrats still going to embrace you? >> i still think that bill clinton's speech at the democratic convention was the most exciting moment of that convention. turned around the whole convention and once again revealed the great talents of bill clinton. >> does he save it? >> you are showing your brilliance again. >> i absolutely agree. a better job than barack obama did. >> i want to add to the clinton tribute. the most charismatic bill clinton. for stellar performance of the democratic national convention. his 40 minute speech was critical for a second term for barack obama. it redefined the global economic crisis. he describ
stronger engines for growth. china slowing, europe is in recession. the main concern -- and this is a risk scenario. what they call a left tale, it's not the baseline, is we get a tipping process. that one bad thing here leads to another bad thing elsewhere which comes back here. and that's why the hope is somehow, somehow, i don't know how, but somehow in the next week, washington will find a way to avoid the fiscal cliff. >> from your lips to god's ears, thanks very much. mohammed al arian. mark zandy and christine romans. as long as congress does not trip us up, we're on the way to an economic renaissance in our country. >>> we are on the road to an economic renaissance. i want to you think about the united states economy like a runner along this road. full economic recovery and prosperity is the destination, the economy right now, that's warming up with a nice jog, getting ready to break into a full sprint. gross domestic product, the broadest measure for the economy grew by an annual rate of 3.1 over the summer, more than double the rate of the previous quarter. spending by americans
.s. engineer who went to china and saw them building a dam. and china's o so interested in having jobs and job creation. and the u.s. engineer goes to china, and he sees them building a dam, and they're all using shovels. and the engineer asks the chinese engineer, why are they using shovels? why don't you have them use modern equipment? we're trying to create jobs. and so the british -- engineer says why don't you give them spoons? [laughter] all jobs are not the same. the idea that we somehow reduce spending or even if we reduce the growth of government spending which would be an important first step does not mean we're going to see retardation in growth levels. those people who actually do capital investment. so i've been arguing as kevin said on entitlement reform. the federal government spent $3.5 trillion last year. of that about 1.5 was social security, medicare and medicaid. three big government expenditure programs are about 45% of government expenditures. those are growing. in 2010 medicare and medicaid combined spent more than social security. social security is a $750 billion progr
, a man entered a school in the province in china, obviously, mentally disturbed, he tried to kill as many children as he could. but all he had access to was a knife. the result, despite many injured, not one child died. the problems that for deuproduc newtown mas ker. you find my column on cnn.com/fareed. let's get started. >>> so, let's get right to it. a conversation about the real economic problems this country faces on my right and on their right glen hubbard the former chief economic adviser of cheney campaign. on my left, peter orzack, obama former budget director and sort of in the middle, the economist, economics editor and kristen editor of reuters digital. i promised we were going to get past the cliff. but i have to ask a few questions about it. you don't think it's that big of a deal if we go over the cliff. >> i don't think it's that big of a deal if we get to january 3rd or january 4th and we don't have an agreement because we'll have one very soon after. if we did nothing for months, it would be disastrous. not only the combination of tax increases and spending cuts push th
in the province in china, obviously, mentally disturbed, he tried to kill as many children as he could. but all he had access to was a knife. the result, despite many injured, not one child died. the problems that produce the newtown mas ker. are not complex nor are the solutions. we do not lack for answers. what we lack in america today is courage. for more on this take a look at my "washington post" column. you'll find it on cnn.com/fareed. let's get started. >>> so, let's get right to it. a conversation about the real economic problems this country faces. on my right and on the right, glen hubbard, the former chief economic adviser of the romney campaign and dean of the business school. on my left, peter orszag, obama former budget director and sort of in the middle, zanny minton beddoes and chrystia freeland, be editor of routers digital. i promised we were going to get past the cliff. but i have to ask a few questions about it. just this. you don't think it's that big of a deal if we go over the cliff. >> i don't think it's that big of a deal if we get to january 3rd or january 4th and we don
want to point out that there was eaks lent story, i believe on npr, about a rampage in a china school in which a madman went after children in a school with a knife and he stabbed over 20 of them, but none of them died. and that's the key difference. when you have an automatic weapon that you can rapidly reload, when you have a gun, it kills. it kills more easily. it's hard to stab people to death. >> certainly you're not suggesting that a communist society rules are what we should follow. i mean, a mentally disturbed man stole guns. i haven't been shown any piece of legislation that is going to change that. if there was a gun law that would change the fact that a mentally disturbed man couldn't steal a gun, i would be for it, but the simple fact is, judy, i don't care what law you're going to put in place, the mentally disturbed man is going to steal a gun. >> you can't abolish-- >> he didn't have to steal it, he took it from his mother, what happened in columbine, took them from their parents and the n.r.a., i consider to be a completely utterly destructive organization in this soci
said. his point was that the transformation of the world economy lifts four people in china and india out of poverty and into the middle class, and meanwhile one american drops out of the middle class, that's not such a bad trade, right? like four to one. i spoke to a cfo of a u.s. technology company, and this was like a really, a person who was really sort of charming and lovely life story. he was taiwanese-born, his parents were immigrants, and his parents told him and his brother when they immigrated that they were temporarily poor. i love that, you know, imagine that. we're going to be temporarily poor. and sure enough, he and his brother just like complete rock stars, both of them went to stuyvesant in new york. they were such avid members of the math club that now they fund it. one brother is -- yeah, exactly. one is in silicon valley, the other is derivatives on wall street. this brother, the cfo, his parents were really angry at him because he dropped out of a ph.d. program at stanford having gone to harvard to start becoming a plutocrat. so very hard working guy, very smart,
and china and bamboo and native plants. >> they're trimmed to a human scale so you relate to them on a human level. >> this is one of my favorite sections and you can see the goarnlrous maples by the bamboo back drop and especially beautiful in the fall when the leaves start changing colors. just around the corner from maple lane this little garden is called a zen garden, a dry landscape garden and constructed here in 1953. this was originally designed by zen monks for the ground. their main purpose was to create a trairchg tranquil setting for the monks. this is no ordinary bridge. it's made of redwood, oak and cedar. the high arch style makes it easy to pass under. the newly refurbished tea house is in the center of the gard scpen a great place to eat and chill as you take in the view of the garden. if you wish you can experience the rich cultural tradition that celebrates the preparation of green tea or matcha and your host dressed in the ceremony will demonstrate how to clean the utensils and receive and drink tea with ancient japanese customs. the art of the tea ceremony once ava
, several more than once. she accompanied her husband on the groundbreaking trip to china and set new precedence herself by traveling as an official representative united states to the migration of president william tolbert of liberia in 1972 and repeating the task in 1974 by attending the swearing-in ceremony of her a nest of gazelle. wherever she went she espoused the same practice utilized during her travels in 1950's. she strove to make as many strands -- france is possible for herself in the country. while her desire to make friends everywhere might've had clinical consequences it arose from a sincere desire to look beyond the dignitaries to the people of the countries he visited. in part because of a connection with our own roots. she never forgot who she was or where she came from. she was the daughter of a truck farmer who had supported herself since she was a teenager. at one point during her husbands administration she told a childhood friend that even though she occasionally felt inadequate to the task that quote she was only -- from artesia, the people she met were so grac
if you're looking for a new chinese restaurant look no further than celebrity chef martin yan's my china. after the break we'll take a closer look at the new restaurant in this weeks version of dine and dish. if your furry friends need a place to spend the holidays while you are out of town. there's an app for that! those stories and more when we returne. gabe slate tech report >> if you have paid do if you he a dog and you need to go on vacation, this is a free account when woners can find a local boarder and they hand pick them dog vay cay has 24/7 support and these are official boraders. it was fun for companionship and a nice way to have a pet without having a long term committment and nice side money... a 15% cut is for the app.. a great place with no kennesl for the dogs. >> we had a lot of are rated today we have a lot of rain today i even saw a double rainfali even saw a double rainw pockets of heavy rainfall. and as............... san jose. and as we go towards south san jose towards the valley. the showers are picking up. at this wet weather will return and off the coast of san
by "the detroit news." he's told chrysler to italians were going to make jeeps in china. romney will fight for every american jobs. >> ibm @ rahm and i approve this message. host: that ad was quickly refuted by the obama campaign. this ad became a real distraction to the campaign in the following weeks. they will say if you looked at where the results were in ohio, where they lost was not in the automobile district but elsewhere. it created a stink over the romney campaign in the final days that hurt him everywhere. to us, this ad captures something important. it is their uneasiness about talking about issues that are not helpful for them earlier on but they had to be talked about. this saw the automobile issue was playing on obama's turf. they were talking about it so it was an issue out there. when you don't talk about it and don't explain it, that's a problem. there was a notion run the campaign, if you are explaining, you are a loser. the problem was by not explaining or even addressing, they let themselves be defined. they realize this late in the game. there was huge pressure from el
. >> in addition, to that, we also have the ferry landing at china basin and on average that is home game ain ten dance is dwayned to and from the ballpark by ferries. and with that, we would like again to bring forth, carolyn or began, she is the president of blue and gold fleet and they will she'll be able to give us a better insight and explanation on how important the ferry and excursion services are to the port and bay of san francisco. >> commissioners and director moyer, good afternoon. thank you for giving me the at some point to give you a little i am insight to blue and gold fleet. i would like to start out with a brief history of blue and gold fleet. blue and gold has been a port tenants when the found ore deer recognized the opportunity that existed to operate excursions and cruises. the first set sail from peer 39 and blue and gold expanded into the community computer service in 1931 the service started after the lulla competer earthquake in 1939 and was the beginning of the resurgence in 87. and the service started in 86 when marine world moved to value lay hough when the ser
to be flexible to respond to different market conditions. this china basin park proposals is one of the reasons why the giants the sea well lot 337 llc., proposal is receiving such positive tension it's because of the attention they have given to the design of this water front open space. it would be 5-acres the costs are high. we are looking at entirely newue tillity infrastructure new streets, sidewalks sidewalks and park locate and is improvements to pier 48 currently estimates at over $2 million in current $2,012 and this infrastructure is really needed to unlock the value of this site for the port and for development. very significant this would be an entirely new city neighborhood with significant economic development for the city as a whole and 5,000 construction jobs and over 7,000 permanent jobs on the site and 10,000 jobs regionally with up to 2,000 new residents so erail mentioned the fiscal analysis that we would do through fiscal feasiblable report to the board of supervisors prior to environmental review and the draft fiscal feasiblability for this probability indicates a 9 mil
it. >> but, remember china is north korea's greatest ally and supporter. so, china does see him as sexy. >> why the fascination with him? >> again, the third in the kim dynasty. his grandfather was the founder of north korea. we never saw a photograph of kim jong-un until recently when his father named him as a successor. he went to switzerland. he went to the school where nobody ever knew exactly who he was and believe it or not he is an nba and nike fan and i find it quite fascinating, he does his own buzz cuts, which have become very popular in north korea. >> yeah, okay, that's good to know. listen, we know he had big shoes to fill taking over for his father. the thousands of north koreans lining the streets of pyonyang at the funeral. but now he had this rocket launch. i mean, that was a success. does that change things for him? how is he viewed? >> certainly internal and it does. in april there was a failed launch. so the fact that this one was a success, is terribly important internally. in terms of north korea it's seen as a great win for him. the world has condemned it
to help china, and china is the biggest abortion country in the world. when you throw all this into a big mixture, you cannot blame the gun. host: thank you for the call and comment. a bitter fight had on gun control, according to the washington post. we are following some of the options on what is next. speaker boehner is confronting a political cliff over the budget track is, putting out that the speaker's leadership and legacy remained at stake. they point out that in a show of support, house leader eric cantor. at a news conference with the speaker in a call to extend the tax rates. some have urged congressman tom price of georgia to challenge john deere for the job. much more on what is next for the fiscal cliff. one week before we reach that point. the deadline is december 31, january 1. the president is in hawaii. the house and senate are also in set -- in session this week. elliot engel, weighing in on a number of topics, including rumors that former republican senator chuck a bill could be nominated as defense secretary. you heard from the president on friday as he nominated sena
conference during a crisis with red china, and his aides were warning him to be careful about what he said. don't worry, i'll just confuse them. he did. ike often have bad syntax. i noticed in his private letters and memos were clear as a bell. ike was smiling, congenial but also tough. as vice president richard nixon once wrote that he was a more complex and devious man than people realized. quote i'm and devious in the vastness of the word, added nixon. i was talking to eisenhower's son, john, his dad, about the apparent balance between the sunny congenial ike and the cold-bloocold-bloo ded ike. john smiled for a moment and said make that a 75% cold-blooded. when ike was elected president, military, the top brass were hopeful that the former general could be counted on to spend more on weapons and the military. in fact, ike reduce military spending. he was always wary of the military heightening and the needs for weapon and mean. when he saw the pentagon estimate that the red army could overrun europe in two weeks, he wrote in the margin, i doubt. it took us three months just to take thi
to go into a press conference in a crisis with red china, and aids warned him to be careful. don't worry, said, ike, i'll confuse them, and he did. he had bad syntax, but i noticed in the private letters and memos were clear as a bell. he was smiling congenial, but also tough. his vice president, richard nixon wrote that ike was, quote, a deviant man, devious in the best sense of the word, added nixon. i was talking to eisenhower's son, john, he said, about the apparent even balance about the congenial ike and cold-blooded ike. he said, make that 75% cold-blooded. when ike was elected president, the military, top brass, hopeful the formal general would spend more on weapons and the military: in fact, ike reduced military spending. he was always weary of the military hyping the needs for weapons and men. when he saw the pentagon's estimate, he wrote in the margin, i doubt it, it took us three months just to take sicily. when the spending requests came in, he said, i know the boys at the pentagon. he believed real national security was from a sound economy. he was a deficit hawk, boy, we c
and damaged buildings. china. fire fights go to work on a raging fire in a building and one security guard trapped inside and 50 people staying in a hotel on the top floors . and they're still in the streets . and that is the death penalty. and they will do more to protect women. and in lakeland st. nick's official. and they're leaving to santa and others meet with the evils . and that is a bit unpredictable. one police officer dives in icy waters. how do you put a brand new spin . and building a a merry business. i always wait until the last minute. can i still ship a gift in time r christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. share "not even close." share "you owe me... share "just right." the share everything plan. shareable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. hurry in for a droid razr m by motorola for $49.99. a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthriti
to china and the one from the superpac that seemed to blame bain capital for the death of this workers life. enter, rick santorum. >> euthanasia in the netherlands, but half the people who are euthanized, it's 10%. of all deaths, half of those people are euthanized involuntarily at hospitals so they are older and sick. and so elderly people in the netherlands don't go to hospital. they go to another country because they're afraid because of budget purposes that they will not come out of that hospital. >> don't go trying to track down statistics about involuntary euthanasia in the netherlands. you will find no such facts. now, to harry reid. he made the rounds saying that mitt romney didn't pay taxes for ten years. >> the word is out that he hasn't paid any taxes for ten years. let me him that he has paid taxes, because he hasn't. >> now reid said he got his information from a former bane investor. without any further explanation, he was awarded the maximum number of pinocchios. also u.n. ambassador susan rice has come to terms with the circumstances that led her to take her own name of of t
yearser later and found that johnson & johnson has taken it out of their products in china and other countries but not in the united states, well, if you can do it in one country, why can't you do it in all of them, doesn't everybody deserve safer baby shampoo no matter where they live? that put a lot of pressure on them because the consumers said we don't want those things in our products and the change happened and now they have a plan with timelines and clear transparent goals to get those chemicals out of their products. it might be a little slower than we'd all like as consumers but it's moving in the right direction and getting one major company to move put a lot of pressure on those other companies if they want to maintain their credibility, so we're seeing safer shampoo products, we want to pass laws. >> radiation is the longest and best studied exposure link to breast cancer and what can we do about that, some radiation is naturally occurring, but we know that since 1980, radiation exposures for the average person have doubled and most of that is probably due to a 600 % incr
. >> absolutely not. in china the same day as newtown shooting there was man with a knife that entered a school. nobody was killed. this seems to imply the opposite. that guns out of schools is actual answer. >> i think guns in the hands of the right people or right person could be part of the answer to what we saw here. i don't think there's one size answer fits all or just one answer that will address this. something we have to consider. >> it does -- the newtown massacre really change things are we going to see action in congress, on gun control? >> i think it did change things. whether we will be able to attract enough republicans, republicans even ready to take your economy down so i wouldn't be surprised if they did the same here as they have done to colorado imbibe and wisconsin and dozens of similar massacres. but i do think the country has changed. and i think it's time for people to tell these members who have been imprisoned by the nra to let your member go. >> i wish there was a simple answer. if i really believe that if you ban a certain type of weapon, i don't like to call them as
sectors? >> first of all before we ring the death bell on manufacturing, u.s. is above china. we are seeing a resurgence of factory jobs, guess where. >> gregg: southeast. >> why. >> gregg: right to work states. >> businesses don't want to move to places where unions are. in those southeast states, union membership tends to be half what it is on the national achblg which is only 12% right now. even though we see that unemployment is lower in right to work states, but wages are lower, as well. that is kind the tradeoff but businesses want to go there. we are seeing companies from china coming in into the u.s.. >> gregg: i bmw, hyundai, honda and you got american companies, g.e., boeing, apple, michelin, they like that southeastern region because that is where the unions aren't. final quick question, if congress fails to strike a deal it will get a whole lot worse? >> the cbo which is supposed to be non-partisan we're going into a double-dip recession. a lost taxes. you look at your paycheck, the first one in january you are going to see a lot less money. >> gregg: it's not just th
on arms control and missile defense, wrong on china. i could go on, but i think that -- lou: we are about to run out of countries. >> the president got what he wanted. it will be more of the same. lou: to you agree? >> i think it is a pretty good choice. he won the election. he gets to choose. confirmed pretty readily? represents a sort of mainstream of american foreign policy, a little bit less for me, but not as far left as the first joist. lou: interesting, john mccain and others came out with really unreserved support for senator kerry. let's turn, if we may, to the failure in benghazi. and this report looks to me, i no there are varying views on this. and other whitewash, it seems. >> and the misses the point. we know what happened before and during periodsgrew up some allies, cover-ups. to me with the important thing is, what happened afterwards, which is nothing. then never hunt down, retaliated, responded. look at what happened to the original september 11th. 1998, attacks on u.s. embassies in east africa and in 2000 attack on the u.s.s. cole, we did not repond. we beefed up secur
in 1944 and of course senator inouye was well regarded in china for that service. and so the group of senators, there must have been a dozen of us of both parties got more time with mr. had you and with you than almost the president of the united states would have. we were accorded ever courtesy because of the presence of senator inouye and senator stevens. they were like brothers. they called one another brothers. they served that way in the senate, as chairman and vice chairman of the defense appropriations subcommittee. they over a number of decades single hand edly shaped our american defense posture. and they did it with skill and patriotism and structure very few could have. several senators have mentioned how bipartisan he was. he was of the old school. not a bad schooled for today in my point of slue which he treated each senator with courtesy, teen newer senators. he treated each senator with a sense of quality even those who were in the minority and not on his side of the aisle. he was always fair. he was always you courteous and always tried to do the right thing. he was
. >> this was the week that changed the world. >> richard nixon said when he went to china with you, of course, in '72, the week that he was there, he said this is the week is that changed the world. >> he was right. >> well, those were some of the tough decisions we wanted to analyze. do we agree with the choices these people made? what are the toughest decisions you have made? join in the conversation online. #toughdecisions on twitter or cnn.com/fareed. we'll highlight the most interesting ones on our website. thank you for joining us tonight. we hope your decision to watch our show was not a tough within. >> gabrielle douglas. plus, a true american icon, willie nelson back on the road again at nearly 80 years old. i'll ask him the big question, just how many girls has he lued before? >> the reason divorces are so expensive is they're worth it. diyou wake up this morning and have a -- you know? >> i probably did. i probably did. >> a tv icon, also making a mark as an activist and an author. and incredible work with st. jude's children's research hospital. a veritable legend. how do you feel about b
in northwestern china. firefighters had to rescue people on an expressway on friday, and during the emergency efforts, they had to contend with high winds and low visibility. 70 miles per hour winds and minus 22 degrees fahrenheit. >>> i'm guessing that spanish for i won a lot of money. >> spain's annual christmas payout. most of the winners were from immigrant neighborhoods near madrid. the typical ticket is $26. the return on it is more than $500,000. by the way, the government is the biggest winner in the lottery. it keeps one third of the money collected. >> new plans to keep guns off the streets in san francisco. >> still to come, the type of ammunition targeted and the mayor's proposal. >> first, imagine having a tv that watches you. answering questions when it comes to the high-tech gadgets. an expert joining us live in the studio next. >> and the heaviest rainfall in right now. this morning we given up the possibility of gusty winds and thunderstorms throughout the day. what is your christmas weather forecast? we'll tell you coming up right after the break. ,,,,,,,,,,,, >> and here's
sculpture and watching lester dance but mainly the ice. in northern china, it was all ice as their annual ice festival. with temperatures at 18 below, sculptors are building an entire city of ice that lights up from night from the inside and out. everyone is welcome to visit. lester is welcome to come and dance. >>> this week, busy. nobody knows that better than a guy named santa. we can confirm the presents are all on board. the naughty and nice list in is in his front pocket and his gps is calculating routes. we are good to go on all fronts. that is the news. back to lester, erica and dylan. i am getting mean looks from lester. >> we should explain i busted a move in your office this morning. >> he did not know i was watching. i was like, that was great. he dances when no one is watching. >> very nice, very nice. >> after a little eggnog, i will show you all. >> that will be in about 45 minutes. >>> a lot of people trying to go out and finish their shopping. we are going to see really not a but we are going to see not a lot going on. the west coast is a big story, and it's still produci
with china as they grow. got to deal with the terrorists, and we've got to manage the circumstances in the middle east. so people in washington and the foreign affairs business are going to be very, very busy. iran, syria, israel, the palestinians, a new constitution in egypt, and all around the periphery of the middle east there are still terrorist elements. and there's a problem in north africa with terrorists. >> and i was also going to add to the conversation north korea. >> that's right. >> you heard the news today, they say they have a missile that could potentially reach the united states. of course it could be weaponized. what's your reaction to that? >> well, we've known this was coming for a long time and we have a missile defense program, a rudimentary program, but it's been in place, put it in place several years ago, and it's designed specifically to handle this. actually we're ahead on that. but they've been relentless bad boys. no matter how difficult their domestic situation is, they've always seemed to find the resources to military power and threatening neighbors a
and was stridor who at the age of 85 confronted the government of china in the organization's interest. and by 2007, the world summer olympic games were held in shanghai. shriver also advised the u.s. catholic bishops in drafting a letter on the nuclear war issued in 1983, and he worked to influence the ronald reagan administration to inspect the to expect the no-strike first approach to the nuclear weapons. in 1993, president clinton presented him the presidential medal of freedom. this bareboned account of sargent shriver's life achievement suggests but does not describe the spirit of a man that was a devout catholic and inspired and inspiring father. how can we understand this. and the motivation of such a first kyl and resilient man. striving to understand sargent shriver, i think of the inflated clown toy perhaps two and a half or 3 feet tall favored by 2-year-olds around the world and at the bottom end of the way there is a bag of sand so that no matter how often you push him down, she springs back upright again. it's fun if you are two but sargent shriver was like that his whole
be a lot less effective. in china they've had five school stabbings. the last one, a man stabbed 22 children. how many died? >> none. >> none. so -- imagine if he had an assault weapon. how many would he have killed? certainly -- certainly much more than 22. >> yeah. so -- >> that's simple math. >> lou -- lou, hold that thought. hold that thought. we're going to go away and then come back, and i don't know where the show's going to go. some of the things we had planned for you, the lighter things, might not make it on the air. i'm going to warn you. this is an important conversation. we'll be right back after this break. . the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood
. in china they've had five school stabbings. the last one, a man stabbed 22 children. you know how many died? >> none. so -- imagine if he had an assault weapon. how many would he have killed? certainly -- certainly much more than 22. >> yeah. so -- >> that's simple math. >> lou -- lou, hold that thought. hold that thought. we're going to go away and then come back, and i don't know where the show's going to go. some of the things we had planned for you, the lighter things, might not make it on the air. i'm going to warn you. this is an important conversation. we'll be right back after this break. it is something very spe♪ ♪ i would readily confess [ dogs barking ] ♪ 'cause all i want this season ♪ ♪ is something from your heart ♪ la da da, la da da [ male announcer ] thinking of others this holiday season, travelers. there's the sign to the bullpen. here he comes. you wouldn't want your doctor doing your job, the pitch! whoa! so why are you doing his? only your doctor can determine if your persistent heartburn is actually something more serious like acid reflux disease. over tim
, but they would be a lot less effective. in china they've had five school stabbings. the last one, a man stabbed 22 children. up know how many died? >> none. >> none. so -- imagine if he had an assault weapon. how many would he have killed? certainly -- certainly much more than 22. >> yeah. so -- >> that's simple math. >> lou -- lou, hold that thought. hold that thought. we're going to go away and then come back, and i don't know where the show's going to go. some of the things we had planned for you, the lighter thing, might not make it on the air. i'm going to warn you. this is an important conversation. we'll be right back after this break. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus liquid gels speeds relief to your worst cold symptoms plus has a decongestant for your stuffy nose. thanks. that's the cold truth! but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medi
couldn't have done this. >> absolutely. there was a mass stabbing in china. 23 people stabbed and all of them survived. these tragedies are awful. how armed is a person committing the crime and can police actually be police in that situation. you know, i'm a little pessimistic about something happening out of this. we have to look at 1989. there was a shooting in stockton and a huge out cry. in 1994, a legislation passed. in addition to muddying the waters and registry of mentally ill people is also going to be behind the scenes, too. in stuff that we will never see. it will be lobbying and pressure put on just to slow down the legislation so they can get in all the loopholes that they want. >> just to rich's point. the nra is more aggressive in opposition. you saw after the expiration of the assault weapons ban in 2004, they got aggressive. it was before staying your ground was passed. they banned cities. they got aggressive really quickly. they are still more aggressive than the other side. >> i truly believe, i still believe the vast majority of americans across all affiliations ar
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